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“Please, don’t send us to Hell”

On May 4th hundreds of people protested on the streets of Copenhagen against the forced deportation of rejected asylum seekers from Afghanistan.

 

Photo feature by Yolanda and Sonny (photos)

 

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Afghan protesters were supported by people from Iran, Somalia and other countries. Many Danes also participated in the demonstration, shouting slogans like “Stop deportation”,  “Please, do not send us to hell” and “Here is room” (Danish,”Her er plads”).

 

There was no aggression in their cries, it was more like the cry of the wounded.

 

These days the Afghan deportations brings images to one’s mind of hunters and the hunt. Many Afghans refuse to return voluntarily to Afghanistan, so the police catch them in the asylum centres on “pocket money day”, or at night in the places where they are hiding, taking them by force.

 

“We will not pay the price,” one protester, Asif Danishyar, 24, from Afghanistan told New Times.

“The Afghan president has given the world a false image of security in the state, and we, the asylum seekers, are the victims. Is it a safe and secure to send people back to a country where both men, women and children are killed on a daily basis? Where women are still sold as slaves? My friend Hassan, was recently deported to Afghanistan, and has fled to Pakistan”.

 

Through the microphone protesters said that there is enough space in Denmark to those who seek protection and are willing to integrate into society. Their voice was directed towards the citizens of Denmark, the Immigration Service and the Ministry of Justice.

 

Was the microphone powerful enough? We shall  see.

FACTS

During the spring 2013, 415 people risk forced deportation to Afghanistan. Among them are children, men and women. Many have lived in Denmark up to five years. Children are born and grown up in the Danish refugee camps, and all people in risk fear a dangerous future in Afghanistan.

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